Categories
Java

Do not accept arguments from the command line.

Write a client program and server program. The server uses a socket connection to allow a client to supply a filename and the server will send the file contents to the client or an error message if the file does not exist. The client will create a new file with the same contents. The client will supply the filename “input.txt” to the server and create as it’s output “output.txt”. Don’t ask the user for these names. These files will be located in the top level folder of your project, just like in Eclipse Project 1. The Server sends whatever file the Client requests. Don’t put “input.txt” in the Server. The client must get the contents from the Server. It must not read input.txt directly.
Do not accept arguments from the command line. This means that you are not permitted to get information to use from the args variable in the following: public static void main(String[] args) {
Do not use a path name when opening the files. This means the files should be located in the top level folder of the project.
Do not zip your project, just send the 2 (and only 2) .java files.
You are not permitted to make this program use a GUI. If it uses a GUI, you will receive a 0.
Both programs must be part of the same Eclipse project. One class named Server and one named Client. These must be the ONLY 2 CLASSES. They must be in a package named clientServerPackage. These names are not negotiable and are worth points. Not using these names will cause your program to not compile on my side without me changing them. Capitalization counts. Not following these instructions will result in a 0.
Your name must appear at the top of all source files. This is worth points.
Part of your grade includes indentation and meaningful variable names. See the item in Modules named Java Programming Style Guide.
Submissions that do not meet these requirements will receive a 0. So don’t bother sending 2 separate projects, one for the server and one for the client. It will receive a 0.
You must submit a Project.txt file that states that your program meets all project requirements or states which requirements were not (or only partially) met. It must also list any sources from which you have copied more than 5 lines of code. If you don’t even get your code to compile, you could still earn a few points if you document that it does not compile. Bluffing does not work.
Your class names must be Server and Client. Capitalization counts. It must be in a files named Server.java and Client.java. Otherwise, it gets a 0.
It should be in a package named clientServerPackage, as explained in a previous week’s video. (5% of grade)
Put your name at the top of both source files. (5% of grade)
Project.txt mentioned above must be uploaded. (5% of grade)
You must use proper indentation like in the book and use meaningful variable names. (5% of grade)
Your program must work to earn the above points. You can’t submit a Hello World program that meets those requirements to get some points.

Categories
Java

Do not accept arguments from the command line.

Write a client program and server program. The server uses a socket connection to allow a client to supply a filename and the server will send the file contents to the client or an error message if the file does not exist. The client will create a new file with the same contents. The client will supply the filename “input.txt” to the server and create as it’s output “output.txt”. Don’t ask the user for these names. These files will be located in the top level folder of your project, just like in Eclipse Project 1. The Server sends whatever file the Client requests. Don’t put “input.txt” in the Server. The client must get the contents from the Server. It must not read input.txt directly.
Do not accept arguments from the command line. This means that you are not permitted to get information to use from the args variable in the following: public static void main(String[] args) {
Do not use a path name when opening the files. This means the files should be located in the top level folder of the project.
Do not zip your project, just send the 2 (and only 2) .java files.
You are not permitted to make this program use a GUI. If it uses a GUI, you will receive a 0.
Both programs must be part of the same Eclipse project. One class named Server and one named Client. These must be the ONLY 2 CLASSES. They must be in a package named clientServerPackage. These names are not negotiable and are worth points. Not using these names will cause your program to not compile on my side without me changing them. Capitalization counts. Not following these instructions will result in a 0.
Your name must appear at the top of all source files. This is worth points.
Part of your grade includes indentation and meaningful variable names. See the item in Modules named Java Programming Style Guide.
Submissions that do not meet these requirements will receive a 0. So don’t bother sending 2 separate projects, one for the server and one for the client. It will receive a 0.
You must submit a Project.txt file that states that your program meets all project requirements or states which requirements were not (or only partially) met. It must also list any sources from which you have copied more than 5 lines of code. If you don’t even get your code to compile, you could still earn a few points if you document that it does not compile. Bluffing does not work.
Your class names must be Server and Client. Capitalization counts. It must be in a files named Server.java and Client.java. Otherwise, it gets a 0.
It should be in a package named clientServerPackage, as explained in a previous week’s video. (5% of grade)
Put your name at the top of both source files. (5% of grade)
Project.txt mentioned above must be uploaded. (5% of grade)
You must use proper indentation like in the book and use meaningful variable names. (5% of grade)
Your program must work to earn the above points. You can’t submit a Hello World program that meets those requirements to get some points.

Categories
Java

Note: one property of a set is that the order of elements does not matter.

Four of the major components of relational algebra are union, set difference, intersection, and cartesian product.
Using Java, write a program that calculates these four operations.
I have provided RelationalAlgebra.java to get started.
There are four // TODO comments to explain where to write code
Note: One property of a set is that the order of elements does not matter.

Categories
Java

Researched.

ASSIGNMENT 1
Sub-category: Research Paper
DUE DATE: 28t h OCTOBER, 2022
Evaluation Mark: 15%
Prompt:
“Conditional statements and loops do not foster an object-oriented paradigm”
In this Assignment, students are expected to academically express, justify and theoretically underpin their thoughts and findings based on the prompt above. Structure of the Essay:
1. Introduction
The introduction is the first section of an essay and should be designed as an integral part of the text. The introduction could contain concise but clear statements of the following points, named in subchapters or subheadings as appropriate:
− Why is the topic relevant and what are the open questions to be addressed in the paper
− Aim of the essay or investigation (What is to be presented/found out and why? What research question does the research essay pursue?)
− Delimitation of the topic and possibly topic-related definitions (What can be done in the paper and what cannot? What should be the scope of the intended results?) − Overview of structure and argumentation sequence (How is the work structured and what can the reader expect in the main part?)
It makes sense to think about these introductory remarks early on, even if they are written towards the end of the writing process, to give your work a stringent and clear line of argumentation that extends throughout all parts of the research essay and leads to a meaningful conclusion.
2. Main Body
This part of academic writing should peak and maintain interest through coherent and comprehensible argumentation. This is only possible if the essay has a common thread that links each key point.
Good academic writing does not simply take any result or theoretical position and assume it to be true. Instead, it seeks to prove or disprove the result or position by supporting or countering it with the use of reliable sources and facts. If something is not considered common knowledge, then it must be explained and supported with the use of a theory-based argument. All assumptions, considerations, and arguments must be proven and discussed. Each argument should be as clear and structured as possible.
The topic sentence should be at the beginning of the paragraph with the supporting points connected to it. The structure of individual paragraphs should loosely follow this framework:
Clearly state the main point of the paragraph using a topic sentence.
− Explain the topic sentence and elaborate on it using supporting points.
− Conclude the argument in a way that leads the reader to the next point.
3. Conclusion
The conclusion should give the reader a final, overall impression of the essay. It should not be a repetition of what was written in the essay. The conclusion should draw the arguments to a close. It should summarize the key arguments within the essay and seek to conclude the essay or main claim and answer any questions that were raised. The conclusion can also include any follow-up questions or perspectives regarding the topic that could be further researched.
The conclusion should not include any new ideas or arguments, but rather should state the outcomes regarding the central claim.
Guidelines and Submission Requirements:
This research essay should consist of the following parts:
1. Title Page
2. Introduction, Main part, and Conclusion
3. Bibliography
4. Appendices (if necessary)
Length: Five pages (excluding the Title page, Appendices, and Bibliography)
Paper size: Letter
Margins: Top, Bottom, Left, and Right: 2cm
Font: General Text: Arial (12 pt.); Headings: Arial (14 pt.)
Line Spacing: 1.5
Sentences: Justified
Citations Standards: APA Standards, reference credible papers, and other publications

Categories
Java

You will look at and implement solutions for distributing the load of multiple clients across multiple servers through a distribution mechanism of your choice.

This coursework requires you to design and implement a distributed system to support audio playback over an Internet style network similar to Spotify (https://open.spotify.com). The implemented system must provide an audio playback client and an audio file server, suitable for distribution by replication, that communicate over the network. The client will access and download (or stream) audio files from the server/service and allow them to be played back by the user. You will look at and implement solutions for distributing the load of multiple clients across multiple servers through a distribution mechanism of your choice.
I need the following:
• The full source code for your server, including any build files needed.
• The full source code for your client, including any build files needed.
NOTE: the source code is preferable to be submitted as a complete NetBeans project file, zip-ed.
• A single PDF file containing the testing report and instructions on how to run your system.